Getting Your Dream Job #3: How To Hand In Your Resume

CONFIDENCE IS KEY!

shutterstock_72258340 Below you’ll find various ways on how to go about handing in your resume.

  • Approaching Businesses

– Dress to impress!

– Have your resume, references and cover letter ready (and not crinkled or creased!)

– Walk into the business, ask for the manager.
If the manager is not there at that moment, ask when they’ll be back and return at that time. Do not just hand your resume over to a sales assistant!

– When meeting the manager, shake hands, introduce yourself (name, current occupation/field of study, give a 30 second spiel on what you appreciate about the company and ask if they have any positions available), and most importantly, make sure you smile!

– You’re also going to want to remember the manager’s name (even if that means writing it down once you’ve left) so in any future situation, you can create a personal connection

– The reply to your question about available positions can go a number of different ways:

“Sorry, we don’t have any positions available at the moment”
To which you could reply….
“Ok. What can I do to show you I should be the next person you hire?”
More often than not, saying that is the very thing!

OR

“Yes. We will give you a call in a few days”
To which you could reply…
“Great, look forward to hearing from you. Nice meeting you *insert manager’s name here*” and shake their hand firmly.
If you don’t get the call, don’t fret. Just pop back after the time they said they would call, ask for the manager (hopefully you can ask for them by name this time), shake their hand again and say something along the lines of…
“Hi, I’m John Smith. I came in *insert time period here* and was just wondering if there was any progress on available positions?” Make sure you have your resume, cover letter and references with you.

OR

“Yes. Why don’t you come out into the back now for a quick interview?”
If this happens, make sure you are prepared (Make sure you’ve read Getting Your Dream Job #4: How To Prepare For An Interview)

Do not refuse this offer! Make sure when you go in to meet the manager that you are not in a rush and have the time for this to happen.

  • Website Application

– Cover letters are often required

– References are often required

– Resume will definitely be needed
MAKE SURE FILE NAMES ARE APPROPRIATE!
eg. ‘John Smith Resume’ rather than ‘johnres11’

– Apply for everything you want to!
All it takes is a click – just make sure your cover letter and resume are applicable to the position being offered

Copyright networkyou.org

Getting Your Dream Job #4: How To Prepare For An Interview

STRESS LESS!

shutterstock_88248997 There are 4 things YOU can do to make an outstanding first impression:

  • Be confident in YOU

Dress to impress! Show up confident in yourself and looking professional.
Be convinced within yourself that the company will be better off with you and make sure you can clearly and confidently express why.
Have questions prepared for the interview. Often the employer will ask you if you have any questions about the job, at some point in the interview – make sure you have something to ask!
Appropriate question: Is there any potential to advance to managerial positions within the company?
Inappropriate question: How long is my lunch break?

  • Know YOU

Make sure you can talk about anything on your resume in great detail! But know the right stuff – they don’t want to know WHAT you did in great detail, but rather HOW it shows your character/personality/work ethic.
Have your resume, cover letter and references with you also! (The employer would have most likely lost it by now…)

  • Calm YOU

Be punctual, or even better…EARLY! This will give you time to think through any last minute thoughts, calm all your nerves and shows them that you are serious about the job.
You have nothing to be nervous about. If you get the job, great! But if you don’t, your life is not over. There are a gazillion other jobs out there and probably one that is more suited to you.
Everything happens for a reason, trust God.
And without a doubt, the best way to calm yourself…PRAY! Hand it over to God, he lights your path.

  • Be YOU!

The best thing you can do in a job interview is be yourself. Trying to be something you’re not or acting like someone you’re not can not only misleading to the employer (potentially causing problems after they’ve hired you and you turn our to be a completely different person) but could stop you from getting the job! The worst thing you could do is be fake. Often when people are not themselves, they come across uncomfortable and nervous – this is not the impression you want to be giving!
Be yourself, answer questions honestly, keep with your personality, don’t change yourself for a job. That way, you’ll get the job that is perfect for you! Work doesn’t have to be something we hate!

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Getting Your Dream Job #5: How To Dress To Impress

YA GOTTA BE STYLIN’ IF YA WANT SOME HIRIN’

shutterstock_89476936 You’ve probably seen the term ‘dress to impress’ appear throughout the previous articles…. This is what it means:

  • Dress like the staff
  • If you’re unsure, wear business pants and a white top (Even for retail)
  • Enclosed black shoes
  • Hair back/off your face (this applies to males too)
  • No excessive make up or jewellery
  • Look professional

ATTITUDES FOR SUCCESS!

While you’re still searching for a job, remember these points:

  • Be passionate
  • Show initiative
  • Keep going
  • Keep believing – There is a job out there somewhere for you!

And finally, once you get the job….

CONGRATULATIONS!!!

You have worked your way to success!

– Be early for your first day/shift

– Ask questions if you have them (it shows your understanding), just make sure you aren’t asking something you’re already meant to know/they’ve already told you!

– Take initiative – if you see something that needs to be done, and you know how to do it… do it!

 

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Getting Your Dream Job #2: How To Write Your Resume

BE SPECIFIC AND SHOW YOUR SKILLS

shutterstock_34195231 For most job applications, you’ll need to have a few different things ready. A resume is a definite must! A cover letter is recommended, and it shows your professionalism to have references and referees ready. If you are unsure of what these are, or how to write them, then the points below are for you!

  • Resume

Resumes are like snowflakes, each one is unique!

There are many different ways to write a resume. Depending on the type of job, finding the right template is essential. Google is full of templates for different occupations. But if you’re struggling, use the following basic template:

– Personal Details (name/suburb/phone/emails)
– Career Summary
– Education & Qualifications
– Volunteer work
– Interests
– References & Referees

In any resume, make sure what you are writing is specific, or applicable to that particular job. You want to show all your skills that can apply to that job, but don’t ramble on.

  • Cover Letters

Write a new cover letter for each company you apply to

A cover letter consists of:
– A little about yourself (not so much your qualifications – that is what your resume is for – but rather how you relate to the company)
– What you appreciate about the company
– How you can build on the company (This is where you must research, research and research!!! Go to the company website, find their aim or values, know the history of the company and using this information, make note of how you can support this as an employee)

  • References

Make sure you have at least one reference with your resume. A reference is a document written (and by written, I mean typed) by either a past employer, or someone who knows you/how you work stating all the wonderful things about you and your work ethic! They show employers that you are a valuable employee. Upon leaving places of employment, ask your employer if they can write a reference for you.

  • Referees

Referees are similar to a reference in the sense that they are either a past employer or someone who knows you/how you work/what you excel at, who is happy for your potential employer to contact them seeking information about you. A referee could be your old employer, or someone like your youth leader or Pastor.

When listing a referee on a resume, give their name (first and last), occupation and their phone number.

Before handing anyone’s information over to your potential employer, make sure you have approached your referee asking their permission to be listed as such.

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Getting Your Dream Job #1: How To Find Job Opportunities

shutterstock_63790765 Getting a job doesn’t have to be stressful or difficult and there are often more places than you think looking for staff. You just have to know what you want, and how to market yourself for such. By learning how to….

  1. Find job opportunities
  2. Write your resume
  3. Hand in your resume
  4. Prepare for an interview
  5. Dress to impress

….in this series of 5 articles, getting your dream job will be easy!

So we’ll start with #1: How To Find Job Opportunities

WORK YOUR NETWORK

There are 5 different networks YOU have immediate access to, each offering their own connections to various workplaces.

  • Your Personal Network

Your personal network is the simplest way to get connected to an available position, as all it requires is a friendly question.

Firstly, ask your friends.
There may be positions opening up at their workplace, or they may have heard of other places hiring. (It’s a bonus if their workplace is hiring, as they can potentially recommend you to their boss.)

Then comes the family – Parents, siblings and your Uncle George.
Just like your friends, members of your family may have positions opening up at their workplaces and may have heard of other places hiring. Make sure you don’t forget to chat to Uncle George at Christmas. Often, Uncle George is the CEO of a large company who could do with an assistant or something of the sort. Work all your connections – the least you have to look around, the better!

After asking every friend and family member you possibly can, go to your friendly neighbours.
Similarly, their workplace may be hiring, or they may know of another. However, neighbours differ in the fact that they can give you a workplace that differs to most. They may be an elderly couple who would love to pay you to mow their lawn every couple of weeks, or a couple with kids, who wouldn’t mind paying you to pick the kids up from school, or babysit them on date night – so it never hurts to stick your head over the fence and discuss your lack of employment.

Get friendly with the locals.
This point is for those of you on a first name basis with your baker or newsagent. Local businesses love supporting community and there is a good chance they need someone else to bake the bread or sell the newspapers every now and then. Casually let them know you’re looking for a job.

  • Internet

The internet is FULL of potential jobs, you just have to find them.

Facebook (www.facebook.com) – What’s on your mind? “Anyone know of any places hiring?” Hopefully the comments start rolling in….

Seek (www.seek.com.au) – They call themselves Australia’s #1 job site, try and prove them wrong.

Gumtree (www.gumtree.com.au) – Gumtree is filled with various job opportunities, ranging from banking and finance to nanny/babysitting. They even have call centre jobs. Even if there isn’t a suitable job for you on there, it may give you ideas of other places to apply to.

Company sites – such as The Cotton On Group (http://shop.cottonon.com/careers/) – a website that lets you apply to 7 different companies from the one website, or sites for companies like MYER (http://www.myer.com.au/careers), that allow you to apply for retail, or office jobs.

  • Print Sources

Your trusty local newspaper or Saturday paper will have a classifieds full of job opportunities staring you in the face – worth a squiz I say.

It may also be worth a stroll through your local shopping centre, taking note of any job ads in shop windows.

  • Agencies

If you apply to the requirements, Centrelink can list you as a job seeker, and hook you up with one of their employees who will go through your resume with you and help you apply for jobs.

Private Recruitment Agencies such as http://www.kellyservices.com.au/ are another support service who can guide you through the job application process.

  • Cold Calling

Approaching places of interest with your resume in hand and dressed to impress! (See: Getting Your Dream Job #3: How To Hand In Your Resume)

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How do I know which career is right for me?

#1 You did it! You survived high school and in a just few months your life in the real world is going to begin. Some of your friends have already started to make plans, university courses, internships or apprenticeships. But for you the future is not that clear, which makes any decisions in the present seem impossible.

You’re not alone. Many students find themselves at the end of their school years with no better idea of what career to pursue than when they started. So how do you figure out which career will be right for you?

Talk to people you trust

The best way to work out which career path to jump on is to learn about yourself. You may already have an idea of what you like: subjects at school, hobbies or extracurricular activities. Talk to your friends and family about what you enjoy about each activity. Ask them what they think and have them ask you questions about your passions and strengths. You may be surprised by what you learn from these conversations. Talk to your teachers, coaches and your guidance counselor at school, they may be able to give you some additional advice. Try to think about what you are naturally good at, this could also give you an indication of the direction you can go in.

Career tests

Your school guidance counselor may have a career test that you could complete to get some suggestions of careers that would suit your personality or skill set. The Internet also has lots of great resources that could help. Simply search for career tests on the web and you’ll find a #2few that may be suitable. You don’t have to take these tests as law, many of them are designed to make suggestions and give you ideas, not to guide your life. There are also options for paid career tests. Do some research to find the best option for you.

Research research research

Spend time on career websites like seek.com.au or mycareer.com.au looking at the different career options in industries. If you get an idea for a career that appeals to you, look at job ads for the position and find out what qualifications, skills or even personality types employers are looking for. This is will help to clarify if the career is a good fit for you. You may also be surprised at the number of career options in an industry or the entry-level requirements for positions.

Read

There are loads of websites that are specifically geared toward helping people explore different career or course options. You simply have to search for terms like “careers advice” or “course finder” to find a range of websites that are tailored to your needs. You could also try libraries or bookshops for books on topics like career options or particular industries.

Research University or Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses

#3 Information about university and VET courses are readily available in the course guides created by the education institutions or on their websites. Read through the course descriptions of degrees or courses that interest you and take a note of the suggested career paths for graduates.

Whether you decide to pursue a career for stability and financial security or for passion and enjoyment, following your interests, skills and personality is a good guide. This means you have to know yourself and have confidence in your ability. Remember that nothing is set in stone once you leave high school, you can always change courses, or pursue a completely different career path once your complete you undergraduate degree.

To connect with Year 12’s transitioning to University, click HERE.

To connect with others from your University, click HERE.

Is a gap year right for me? Some tips to get the most out of a gap year.

#1The decision to take a gap year is a big one and should be made after careful consideration. If done well a gap year can equip you with valuable experiences, any may even give you a clearer direction of the career path you want to pursue. If handled poorly you could waste a year getting apathetic in a dead end job or lose focus by getting caught up in reckless living.

There are many things you can do on a gap year. Whether you’ve decided to go travelling or you’ve got your sights set on full time for a year, you should take some time to work out what you want to get out of the year.

Lots of students choose to do extensive travel before you settle into full time study. Travel can be a wonderful eye-opening time and a lot of fun too. There’s nothing wrong with having a good time, but focusing solely on this can give you a false sense of achievement until you get back home and realize you’re no better off than when you left.

#31 If you’ve decided to jump on the next plane out of your city when you finish year 12, think about incorporating some interesting work experience opportunities, if you have the right visa, and /or some worthwhile charity work can make a lot of difference to your year. Sight seeing tourist stuff is great, but doing some hard work in country will give you a sense of purpose and may give you some ideas for your future career.

If you want to take a gap year to work, may sure that you have some clear personal development goals for the year. Full time work in the right business will give you some great skills in time management, meeting deadlines, structure and can help you to develop a strong work ethic. If you find that your manager or supervisor has some skills, traits or work habits that you admire, consider asking them to mentor you. All of this personal development will help you with your studies if you decide to go to university and will hold you in good stead in your career.

You may have in mind engaging in a combination of part-time or casual work as well as internships and volunteer work. Again having specific goals are very important for keeping you on track. With internships be sure to research your options well and keep an open mind with the position you secure. The goal is to get experience in an industry you may be interested in working in. Companies typically give interns all the menial jobs, so make sure you take a positive attitude and use your time to make a good impression and ask lots of questions if you have the opportunity.

There is also the option of using your gap year to work hard and save money for your study expenses or some other big financial goals. If you decide to go down this route be sure to make your financial goals clear and work out a budget that will help you to get there. It’s also helpful to have someone, your parents or someone else that you respect keep you accountable to your goals. Give yourself some milestones to keep yourself on track and celebrate by treating yourself to something nice each time to achieve a milestone financial figure on the way to your goal.

Which Uni? Which course? Which subjects? How to make the best choices for you.

#1

The decisions you make in your final year of high school often seem like enormous life altering ones! All the adults that have been telling you what to do have now taken their hands off of the steering wheel of your life and now everyone expect you to make the calls. Don’t worry, everyone has been through this, and you will survive! Now back to the main game, which university should you go to, which course should you study, which subjects do you choose?  

Everyone has a different approach to making their choices. The best place to start is to consider some careers that may interest you. If you have a clear picture of a career path like say, dentistry, engineering or teaching, picking a course is no problem.

If your career aspirations are still a little hazy you may need to get a little creative with your choices. You may want to consider a Liberal Studies or Arts degree, which gives you a broad tertiary education. After three years you can either start an internship or working full time, or you could go into postgraduate study in an area that interests you for academic or career focused reasons.

Many graduates go on to study postgraduate law, psychology, communications,  business administration and more as a way of moving toward their career aspirations. The great this about this is that you don’t have to know exactly where you want to go when you’re 18 years old. You can work it out as you study. Depending on the postgraduate course you may need to have a major or a minor in the subjects that the postgraduate course will build on. Ultimately, however, you can find a way to get into the course you want to by talking to the heads of faculties and with lots of hard work.

The reason you may choose one university over another can #2also be varied! Every university has its own particular strengths and weaknesses. Some universities have a wonderful heritage and history for excellence in academia, while others offer forward thinking, practical course that equip you for the workforce. Some have industry heavy hitters on staff and some provide the best technology and the best student support options. Some offer online study options…

Have a close look at course outlines as these will give you a good indication of what type of study program each university provides. If you want to be an actor, “Performance studies” may look like a good option. On closer inspection you may find that one university course is performance based and assessments include theatrical performances by students. While other universities offer a more theoretical study of the history of theatre performance and all the assessments are essays.

Make a list of your options and start to assess which sounds more appealing to you. Consider things like whether moving interstate for the best architecture course in Australia is worth the expense and strain of being away from friends and family. These decisions should be based on the kind of person you are and the kind of experience you want, as well as the course your going for.

Buying Your First Car

shutterstock_53446393Are your parents tightening up on how much you can use their car? Then it’s time my friend to bite the bullet and get your own. While this may seem a daunting task, here are a few practical things that will help you to win in the world of purchasing a pre loved automobile.

Consider the whole price:The owner may be asking $3,600 for the car, but it may not include a Road worthy certificate, this alone could cost you between $200-$1500. The roads authorities in your state will charge you a fee to transfer the car into your name which for a $4,000 car will cost you approximately $250. Not to mention insurance, this will cost you approximately $400 per year for third party. So at the very least you will need to pay $650 above the asking price to get your car on the road.

Be wise:Unless it’s a vintage car, cars do not increase in value. While you want to get something that meets your needs and suits your personality, be aware that at the end of the day cars take your money they do not make you money. If you’re considering financing a car or getting a personal loan, definitely err on the side of the least amount you have to pay back the better.

Where to find them: While you may search for cars in the local paper, most often both dealerships and private sellers use www.carsales.com.au or www.drive.com.au. You can search for cars on eBay but be aware that most cars on eBay do not come with a road worthy certificate.

Take a spotter:When checking out your newshutterstock_15122191 sweet ride to be, make sure to take someone along with you. A fresh set of eyes will be able to point out faults in the car that you may overlook in the euphoria of the moment.

Things to ask the seller:The more that you can find out about the history of the car the better. Ask things like, can I see the service history booklet? When were the brakes changed last? Has this car been in a major accident? How much tread is left in the tyres and does this car come with a Road worthy certificate.

Danger signs:If you notice traces of water on the inside of the engine cap, noises from the back end of the car when you change gears, that a magnet doesn’t stick to the car body or that the gears do not change smoothly. It’s probably best to keep looking because these signs point to problems which could cost you a lot of money.

Taking that step and buying your first car is incredibly exciting, and it doesn’t need to be such a daunting process. Simply be wise, look in the right place, take a friend and ask the right questions and you’ll be on your way to fun filled motoring in no time.

Article by Raymond Mitchell 20/09/11